Tangelo, Minneola* (S+) - 24 inch Box
Tangelo, Minneola* (S+) - 24 inch Box

Tangelo, Minneola* (S+) - 24 inch Box

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Your Price: $425.00
Pick-up from Nursery Lot in OCTOBER with special arrangements.

MINNEOLAs are deep red orange, very sweet, and have high juice content *One of Greg's favorite fruit trees for the Valley!
Minneola is a hybrid of Duncan grapefruit and Dancy tangerine. The fruit is large, typically 3 - 3½ inches in diameter, appear pear or bell-shaped with a stem-end neck. The peel is relatively thin, smooth, and tends to adhere to the internal fruit surface. The fruit will typically have 7-12 seeds due to the influence of cross-pollination. The trees are fairly cold hardy, quite vigorous and with adequate room can grow large. Published research indicates that Minneola blossoms are self-incompatible and need a mandarin for cross pollination except for Satsumas and Minneola’s siblings, Orlando, and Seminole. However, on The Urban Farm Minneolas are self-pollinating, quite tasty, and quickly became one of Greg's Favorites. Cross pollination of other fruit with Minneolas will increase likelihood of seeds. Minneola should be harvested late in the season to ensure a desirable sugar to acid ratio. If left on the tree too long, the following crop will yield less fruit.
Item#: CP-Tgo-Min-24
Availability: Out of Stock Does not ship. Local pick up ONLY.
Sold as = 24" Box requiring special transport
Fertility = (+) Cross pollenates with most Mandarins
Projected Harvest = Dec to Feb, Strong alternating crops
*One of Greg's favorite trees!
Minneola is a hybrid of Duncan grapefruit and Dancy tangerine produced in Florida by the USDA and named and released in 1931. Most Minneola fruit are characterized by a stem-end neck which tends to make the fruit appear pear or bell-shaped. The fruit is usually fairly large, typically 3 - 3½ inches in diameter. It has a deep red-orange color, a very sweet flavor, and high juice content. The peel is relatively thin, smooth, and tends to adhere to the internal fruit surface. Fruit produced on trees in solid plantings of Minneola are likely to be seedless (or nearly so), while trees in mixed plantings will typically have 7-12 seeds due to the influence of cross-pollination.

Minneola should be harvested late in the season to ensure the fruit reaches a desirable sugar to acid ratio. If left on the tree too long, the following crop will yield less fruit. Minneola trees are quite vigorous, and given adequate room to develop, will make large trees. They also tend to be fairly cold-hardy. Minneola blossoms are self-incompatible and must be cross-pollinated by a suitable pollinator to ensure good fruit set. Most mandarin-types are suitable pollinators, with the exception of Satsumas and Minneola’s siblings, Orlando and Seminole.

Urban Farm experience with Minneolas are very favorable and they quickly became one of Greg's Favorites. On the Urban Farm the Minneola IS self pollinating, however research indicates that it is self-incompatible and needs a mandarin (anything except the Satsuma).  Cross pollination with Minneolas will increase likelihood of seeds.

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